2521 S. Fort Apache Rd, Las Vegas, NV 89117

Sun-Thu 11AM - 9PM
Friday 11AM - 2.30PM

Closed On All Jewish Holidays & Saturday.

Kosher Best Practices From The Kosher Deli Las Vegas

For many Jews, kosher food is more than just health and food safety. It is about respecting and observing religious traditions.

At the Kosher Deli Las Vegas, we try to serve everything that is Kosher to help our Jewish brethren to keep up with their religious beliefs.

Below we would like to share the kosher best practices that we follow strictly. Since we are a deli, we handle mostly kosher meats as such; this what we will concentrate on today.

Kosher strictly prohibits certain combinations of foods

Some major kosher dietary guidelines prohibit certain combinations of foods, especially meat and dairy.

There are three main types of kosher foods.

  • Meat (Fleishig)

These are Mammals or poultry and products derived from them (including bones or soup).

  • Dairy (Milchig)

Dairy products (milk): milk, cheese, butter, yogurt.

  • Fish and eggs (Pareve)

Foods are other than meat and dairy products, such as fish, eggs, and plant foods.

In addition, all utensils and equipment for processing and washing meat and dairy products must be separate, even when washing dishes.

Only certain products of animal origin are kosher

Most of the kosher rules concern food of animal origin and how they slaughter and prepare them.

Dairy products are separate entities, and you should not consume or mix with meat or meat products. Fish and eggs are lean and have their own rules.

Meat (fleishig)

According to Jewish law, treating meat like a kosher requires the following conditions:

  • It must be from lilacs (or split) ruminants such as cows, sheep, goats, lambs, cows, and deer.
  • The only meat that can be cut comes from Jewish ruminant precursors.
  • You can eat some types of poultry such as chicken, geese, quail, pigeons, and turkeys.
  • Only an employee with training and certification can slaughter livestock and other animals following Jewish law.
  • Before cooking, you must soak the meat to remove blood stains.

Dairy products (Milchig)

Dairy products such as milk, butter, cheese, and yogurt must adhere to specific rules to be Kosher.

  • Do not mix with meat derivatives such as gelatin or rennet (an enzyme of animal origin). This is common in hard cheeses and other processed cheese products.
  • It should also be prepared using kosher equipment and equipment that has not been used for processing meat products.

Fish and eggs (pareve)

Although the rules are different, fish and eggs are classified as neutral or neutral. That is, it does not contain milk or meat.

  • Fish are kosher only if they are fins or scales (tuna, salmon, halibut, mackerel, etc.).
  • Eating shrimp, crab, oysters, red shrimp, and other types of crustaceans wrong.
  • Clean poultry and fish eggs may be allowed as long as no blood stains are present.
  • Like fish, eggs can be eaten with meat and dairy products.

How does the certification work?

There is an established system for the certification of specific foods.  And kosher-certified food products have a label on the package indicating that they meet all the required requirements.

Conclusion

If you wish to follow kosher dietary guidelines, we at kosher deli Las Vegas recommend that you only choose foods that have a label to avoid accidentally ingesting non-Kosher foods.

 

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp

More from our blog..